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Teaching the Profoundly Dyslexic Child

by Marianne | from https://tinyurl.com/rxr7naw Every child with dyslexia is unique. There is no one profile of strengths and weaknesses that typifies every person with dyslexia.  There are signs of dyslexia that can be known, but not every person will have all the signs or struggle with the same things. One of the reasons for this is that there are… Continue reading Teaching the Profoundly Dyslexic Child

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Iowa lawmakers consider plan to help students with dyslexia

from https://tinyurl.com/u9va88u DUBUQUE, Iowa (AP) — Micah Ripperger sat at his kitchen table recently as his mom helped him sound out words in a book. “I want to know what this word is,” Christine Ripperger told her son. “You told me the sounds. Put them together.” Micah, a fourth-grader at Resurrection Elementary School in Dubuque,… Continue reading Iowa lawmakers consider plan to help students with dyslexia

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Accommodating Students With Dyslexia

These five easy-to-implement accommodations can make class less stressful and more manageable for students with dyslexia. By Jessica HammanApril 12, 2018 ©Shutterstock/Ursula Ferrara For many of us, reading is as automatic as breathing. But for the millions of students with dyslexia, reading is a difficult task that poses constant academic and emotional challenges. To simulate the… Continue reading Accommodating Students With Dyslexia

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Reading, Human Exceptionalism, and Dyslexia — Reflections

Only human beings read. The act of reading involves blending the sounds of letters to form words that symbolize ideas, objects, or entities (abstract or concrete). Interestingly, both religious and secular scientists in various disciplines today think that human exceptionalism—the idea that humans differ from animals in kind, not mere degree—is evidenced in part by… Continue reading Reading, Human Exceptionalism, and Dyslexia — Reflections

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People who cannot read may be three times as likely to develop dementia

Date: November 14, 2019 Source: American Academy of Neurology Summary: New research has found that people who are illiterate, meaning they never learned to read or write, may have nearly three times greater risk of developing dementia than people who can read and write. New research has found that people who are illiterate, meaning they… Continue reading People who cannot read may be three times as likely to develop dementia

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Regular exercise changes the brain to improve memory, thinking skills

POSTED APRIL 09, 2014, 5:00 PM , UPDATED APRIL 05, 2018, 4:38 PM Heidi GodmanExecutive Editor, Harvard Health Letter There are plenty of good reasons to be physically active. Big ones include reducing the odds of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Maybe you want to lose weight, lower your blood pressure, prevent depression, or just… Continue reading Regular exercise changes the brain to improve memory, thinking skills

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Parents pay thousands for ‘brain training’ to help kids with ADHD and autism. But does it work?

Dec. 20, 2019, 12:52 PM EST By Erin Einhorn Some families say they’ve seen transformative benefits from programs that claim to rewire the brain. But many researchers say the evidence is thin. OXFORD, Mich. — It was 4 p.m. on a Monday afternoon, time for Izak Lopez, 6, to remove one sock — just one —… Continue reading Parents pay thousands for ‘brain training’ to help kids with ADHD and autism. But does it work?